Advance Review: Waves

40744544★★★★☆

Waves is a brief and poignant story of the world-shattering loss of a child and a young couple’s life in the aftermath. Chabbet weaves their tale of recovery, based on her own experiences.

It’s hard to say that I enjoyed this story in the typical sense. My heart ached at every page during their journey of learning to cope with the reality of losing their son as I was touched by Carole Maurel’s gorgeous illustrations. My only qualm with Waves is that it left me wanting more.

 

Continue reading “Advance Review: Waves”

Advance Review: A Quick & Easy Guide to Queer & Trans Identities

★★★★★

This is a book I wish I could’ve handed to a younger version of myself. In this beautifully illustrated graphic novel queer identities of all varieties are explored by our narrator, a snail. It is clear that this book was made to be accessible to younger readers, but I would recommend it to anyone looking to learn more about identities beyond their own, those trying to figure out what identity suits them, and allies trying to educate themselves.

Other reviewers have critiqued the fact that a book geared towards younger readers includes a section on relationship basics, but it was a touch that I actually loved. If you are closeted or struggling with your identity, there may never be an opportunity for you to learn about what the basis of a healthy relationship is or signs of a partner that may be controlling and/or manipulative. I think there is little harm in the way this was approached- emphasizing self love and open communication. It is clear that the authors aimed to make this an accessible, inclusive read and I can wholeheartedly say they succeeded. Continue reading “Advance Review: A Quick & Easy Guide to Queer & Trans Identities”

Advance Review: The Time Collector

★★★☆☆41711272

I have such mixed feelings about this book. I loved the premise and I wanted to love the story, but it wasn’t meant to be.

The Time Collector focuses on a group of gifted individuals known as psychometrists. Psychometrists range in their strength, but all share the ability to discern the past of objects the touch. Our male protagonist, Roan West, is one of the most powerful psychometrists among their small numbers. Roan has become increasingly worried with the disappearances of several psychometrists across the globe, including one of his closest friends. Then arises the problem of Melicent Tilpin.

Melicent is a young woman scraping by as she tries to balance work and raising her teenage brother following their mother’s recent death. She’s also a psychometrist whose powers have newly awakened. After peering into the past of objects found at flea markets and antique swaps, Melicent find herself on Antiques Roadshow where her items are appraised for tens of thousands of dollars and she’s admitted her gift to the world. Upon seeing the video Roan rushes across the country to warn Melicent, hoping she’ll listen.

The greatest triumph of The Time Collector is Gwendolyn Womack’s skill as a writer. This book touches on phenomena like out-of-place artifacts (OOPArts), crop circles, and more as Womack spins a tale that spans all of Earth’s breadth and history. I went in with very little foreknowledge of many of the phenomena she describes, but I never found myself lost in the explanations – the world she creates is easy to slip in to and enjoy. Some of the chapters that I enjoyed most were those where as a character reads an imprint, you are transported back in time. From 18th century Vienna to South Korea on the cusp of The Forgotten War, these periods are captured with incredible realism that drew me in despite their intrusion into the main plot.

So here’s the caveat of all this: I just didn’t like the romantic aspect. I was pulled in by the tension between Melicent and Roan through the first half of their story, but once the romantic tension was dissipated everything seemed to lose momentum. I’m also seldom a fan of stories where two characters are fully in love in a matter of just days. I tried to see past it because there was so much else that I enjoyed, but it ultimately left me feeling a little disappointed as I finished this book. I’m certain The Time Collector will be the perfect read for many people, just not me. Continue reading “Advance Review: The Time Collector”

Advance Review: Safely Endangered

★★★★★ 42954198

As a long time fan of Chris McCoy’s comics, and I’m thrilled to have received an advance copy of his first collection, Safely Endangered.

This collection of comics includes some of the greatest hits from McCoy’s webcomic of the same name, alongside comics that are exclusive to this collection. As some reviewers have already voiced, the humor isn’t for everyone. Count me out of this group. These comics are witty, twisted, a little dark, but unfailingly hilarious. McCoy is a master of his medium and his debut collection is not to be missed. Continue reading “Advance Review: Safely Endangered”

Monthly Wrap Up: March 2019

Hello book friends! Spring break meant this was a heavier month for reviews, so there will be a bit to chat about here. This month 10 books were reviewed on The Book Stack with an average rating of 4.1 stars. There were so many great books this month, I feel like you all may be getting the impression that I’m a super lenient reviewer.

In addition to all the new posts, a new directory of reviews was added this month! You can now browse all reviews sorted by title, author, and rating. You can also follow via email to receive book reviews in your inbox. Now that I’ve been at this on a consistent basis for two months I’ll be slowly adding on more to this website, participating in tags and challenges, and hopefully hosting a giveaway in the coming months!

I’ve had so much fun talking to everyone on here and on your own blogs, so if you’d like to connect with me on Goodreads, please do! I’m pretty active on there and I really enjoy seeing updates from my friends. Also, I’m slowly easing into to the world of bookstagram, so if you’d like to watch me fumble around there, you can find me at @the.bookstack

Best of March

No Man of Woman Born39878322This book was, in every sense, an utter joy to read. I tend towards really dark books, so the fact that each short story in this lovely collection had a happy ending was different than the norm and so refreshing. The stories nimbly subverted the longest standing cliches of fantasy without sacrificing the best parts of the genre. You can read the full review here and you can see me rave about this book more on the Trans Day of Visibility post.

 

43397089Eight Lives: What a hell of a debut. Speaking of books that have been on my mind for weeks since reading them, here’s Eight LivesThis book was published by a small Australian press so I know this incredible story won’t reach so many people. Do not be one of those people. This is one of the easiest five star ratings I have ever given. Eight Lives has all the technical intricacy of The Martian, but centered around medicine with multiple perspectives and nonlinear elements and it is still fantastic. Yeah guys, Susan Hurley did that. You can read the full review here, in case I haven’t already convinced you.

 

What I’m Looking Forward to in April

A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C. A. Fletcher:  40698027If a book is described as “for readers who loved Station Eleven” I’m pretty much guaranteed to pick it up. This was one of the first things I heard about A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World and, lo and behold, here we are. Nothing like a little post-apocalyptic fiction to kick off spring the right way.

My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, but we were never lonely on our remote island. We had each other, and our dogs. Then the thief came. There may be no law left except what you make of it. But if you steal my dog, you can at least expect me to come after you. Because if we aren’t loyal to the things we love, what’s the point?

Alpha Girls by Julian Gurthe:  41429816I was approved for Alpha Girls months ago and I’ve been eagerly awaiting it since. I feel like it will be popular among the same crowd that enjoyed Bad Blood, since we have another journalistic account of women in Silicon Valley.

In Alpha Girls, award-winning journalist Julian Guthrie takes readers behind the closed doors of venture capital, an industry that transforms economies and shapes how we live. We follow the lives and careers of four women who were largely written out of history – until now.

Lost and Wanted by Nell Freudenberger:  40177418This is my April Book of the Month pick. I have no idea when I’ll be able to fit it in between all the ARCs I’m packing into April but I’ll persevere!

Helen Clapp is a physics professor. She doesn’t believe in pseudo-science, or time travel and especially not in ghosts. So when she gets a missed call from Charlie, her closest friend from university with whom she hasn’t spoken in over a year, Helen thinks there must be some mistake. Because Charlie died two days ago.

 


What are you looking forward to reading in next month? Are we going to be reading any of the same books? Let me know below!